ABOUT TANTIDHATRI

‘Tanti’ in the ancient Pali language, is imagined as a thread going beyond time; and ‘Dhatri’ is the woman who holds it. In the language of performing arts, this thread can have various meanings. It could be lineage, generations, teacher-student relationships, independent auto-didactic realities, the practice of workshops and training, traditional schooling in performing arts all over the world, the passing on of a craft through family connections or apprenticeship, or the absence of references. In this context, it symbolizes how performing knowledge and practice is transmitted from one generation to the other.

Tantidhatri brings together the performance works of women masters across the globe (both created from self-expression and sacred arts), ranging from Theatre, Music and Dance, to the Visual Arts, Ritual and Spirituality. It brings together a generation of women who now embody life-experience in their works, and who will share these experiences generously with their audiences. Tantidhatri Festival is an occasion to meet these women master practitioners, artists, intellectuals, writers and scholars from various backgrounds and lineages, as well as interact with them through workshops and talks.

Tantidhatri is inspired by Transit Festival created by actress-writer Ms. Julia Varley of the Odin Theatret, Denmark, who is also a founder-member of the Magdalena project. Like Transit and The Magdalena Project, Tantidhatri Festival in India is committed to nurturing an awareness of women’s contribution to the performing arts and to support exploration and research by offering concrete opportunities. Tantidhatri Festival encourages women to examine their role in the future of theatre and performance, by presenting their work, sharing methodologies, examining form as well as content and venturing into new collaborative projects.

Parvathy Baul
Co-founder, Ekathara Kalari
Curator, Tantidhatri

ABOUT TANTIDHATRI

‘Tanti’ in the ancient Pali language, is imagined as a thread going beyond time; and ‘Dhatri’ is the woman who holds it. In the language of performing arts, this thread can have various meanings. It could be lineage, generations, teacher-student relationships, independent auto-didactic realities, the practice of workshops and training, traditional schooling in performing arts all over the world, the passing on of a craft through family connections or apprenticeship, or the absence of references. In this context, it symbolizes how performing knowledge and practice is transmitted from one generation to the other.

Tantidhatri brings together the performance works of women masters across the globe (both created from self-expression and sacred arts), ranging from Theatre, Music and Dance, to the Visual Arts, Ritual and Spirituality. It brings together a generation of women who now embody life-experience in their works, and who will share these experiences generously with their audiences. Tantidhatri Festival is an occasion to meet these women master practitioners, artists, intellectuals, writers and scholars from various backgrounds and lineages, as well as interact with them through workshops and talks.

Tantidhatri is inspired by Transit Festival created by actress-writer Ms. Julia Varley of the Odin Theatret, Denmark, who is also a founder-member of the Magdalena project. Like Transit and The Magdalena Project, Tantidhatri Festival in India is committed to nurturing an awareness of women’s contribution to the performing arts and to support exploration and research by offering concrete opportunities. Tantidhatri Festival encourages women to examine their role in the future of theatre and performance, by presenting their work, sharing methodologies, examining form as well as content and venturing into new collaborative projects.

Parvathy Baul
Co-founder, Ekathara Kalari
Curator, Tantidhatri

Tantidhatri 2019

Tantidhatri is India’s first International Women’s Performing Arts Festival. Its first edition took place in Pondicherry in 2012 and the second, in Bangalore in 2016. This third edition, will take place in Kolkata from 15th till 20th of January 2019. Tantidhatri aims at being a space of engagement for artists, thinkers and groups that are committed to women’s work
in the field of performing arts.

The festival will donate its surplus amount for education of girl children in India. Although physically it is a five day event filled with performances, critiques, talks and interactions, the spirit of the Tantidhatri is universal and not bound by time or space. This year the theme is ‘Energy’ and through the festival, we will be channelizing all our efforts towards the positive flow of energy in all things physical and meta physical.

Tantidhatri 2019

Tantidhatri is India’s first International Women’s Performing Arts Festival. Its first edition took place in Pondicherry in 2012 and the second, in Bangalore in 2016. This third edition, will take place in Kolkata from 16th till 20th of January 2019. Tantidhatri aims at being a space of engagement for artists, thinkers and groups that are committed to women’s work
in the field of performing arts.

The festival will donate its surplus amount for education of girl children in India. Although physically it is a five day event filled with performances, critiques, talks and interactions, the spirit of the Tantidhatri is universal and not bound by time or space. This year the theme is ‘Energy’ and through the festival, we will be channelizing all our efforts towards the positive flow of energy in all things physical and meta physical.

Tantidhatri 2016

Second Edition was held at Ranga Shankara, Kappanna Angala and Shoonya in Bangalore from the 17th to the 21st of February, 2016. Artists from 13 different countries were a part of this festival: India’s first International Performing Arts Festival. The festival embraced a diversity of expressions of women in different fields, including theatre, dance, music, sculpture and social change.

All the Artistes at Tantidhatri are dedicated practitioners of their work and art forms, and the festival allowed a glimpse of their work. The performances themselves were, of course testimonials of their practice, whether tried and tested pieces like Julia Varley’s Ave Maria, or experimental new work like Parvathy Baul and Bahauddin Dagar’s Rudrayogini, which was performed for the first time.

Tantidhatri was also a melting pot of different ways of engaging with art, spirituality, politics etc. The traditional Theyyam performances bespoke great discipline by the practitioners in the elaborate costumes and movements. Kaal was another experimental pieces, marrying the three forms of Contemporary Dance, Bharatanatyam and Baul. 1, Madhav Baug, offered the audience an interactive experience, where the stage opened for questions and comments after a short play. It was a rich space of vulnerability and sharing as people could open up their own lives and experiences in relation to the play.

Tantidhatri 2016

Second Edition was held at Ranga Shankara, Kappanna Angala and Shoonya in Bangalore from the 17th to the 21st of February, 2016. Artists from 13 different countries were a part of this festival: India’s first International Performing Arts Festival. The festival embraced a diversity of expressions of women in different fields, including theatre, dance, music, sculpture and social change.

All the Artistes at Tantidhatri are dedicated practitioners of their work and art forms, and the festival allowed a glimpse of their work. The performances themselves were, of course testimonials of their practice, whether tried and tested pieces like Julia Varley’s Ave Maria, or experimental new work like Parvathy Baul and Bahauddin Dagar’s Rudrayogini, which was performed for the first time.

Tantidhatri was also a melting pot of different ways of engaging with art, spirituality, politics etc. The traditional Theyyam performances bespoke great discipline by the practitioners in the elaborate costumes and movements. Kaal was another experimental pieces, marrying the three forms of Contemporary Dance, Bharatanatyam and Baul. 1, Madhav Baug, offered the audience an interactive experience, where the stage opened for questions and comments after a short play. It was a rich space of vulnerability and sharing as people could open up their own lives and experiences in relation to the play.

Tantidhatri 2012

“And that is why whoever aspires for the Truth, We (She and the Lord) simply pull the threads together and bring them here to prepare for the Hour of God. This is the right time” – The Mother

The ‘Tanti’ (thread) is tied
To the rod of ‘Anhad’.
The music plays within,
The sound heard-‘runu, runu’
In my body…
All thirty-two Nadis (Channels of energy flow in the body)
Are alert,
My senses are numb
The divine king elephant of inner awareness
Appears in my heart;
In the brilliance of thousand suns…
Devi (goddess) sings in my voice
Buddha dances
And the theatre of ‘Nirvan’ (Ultimate freedom from birth and death)
Comes in my vision…

VeenaPad (7th century Buddhist Abhadhuti Yogi)

Tantidhatri 2012

“And that is why whoever aspires for the Truth, We (She and the Lord) simply pull the threads together and bring them here to prepare for the Hour of God. This is the right time” – The Mother

The ‘Tanti’ (thread) is tied
To the rod of ‘Anhad’.
The music plays within,
The sound heard-‘runu, runu’
In my body…
All thirty-two Nadis (Channels of energy flow in the body)
Are alert,
My senses are numb
The divine king elephant of inner awareness
Appears in my heart;
In the brilliance of thousand suns…
Devi (goddess) sings in my voice
Buddha dances
And the theatre of ‘Nirvan’ (Ultimate freedom from birth and death)
Comes in my vision…

VeenaPad (7th century Buddhist Abhadhuti Yogi)